Producers

Note

  1. The ten building blocks identified above are the common features of most democratic constitutions. They describe what is often felt needed in order to operate a democratic system of government. Many are also common features of non-democratic states.
  2. No need to use the pyramid structure, but I thought this was a useful way to ascribe a value in terms of importance (or essentialness) to the ten building blocks.
  3. At the bottom are the building blocks that are absolutely essential, ascending in order of diminishing importance to the top at which are building blocks that are not essential.
  4. This order however should be regarded as relatively fluid – some countries may find essential what others may find marginal – but in all cases, the foundational building block in terms of a government at the bottom is sine qua non.

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Note

    Here space shows a relationship between the executive and the legislature, through a spatial connection to each other. the relationship between the two range between one in end the legislative space dominates or controls access to the executive to one in which the executive controls access and dominates movement into and through the space representing the legislature. This is manifested in the kind of openings between the places and the connecting spaces between them being direct or convoluted.
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Note

    Sanjana’s original idea was a totem-pole like creation in, firstly, a 3D virtual space. The spine on a vertical axis to Sanjana symbolised constitutional rule, and the rest of the elements a subjective interpretation of aspects of the constitution. Channa’s imagination went further, looking at each of the elements as a distinct spatial structure, and the connections between them to also then capture the inter-relation of the various aspects in a constitution as flagged by Asanga in his original note. There was a lot of discussion around how the territorial aspect noted by Asanga could be captured. Sanjana came up with some suggestions but Channa’s point was that no matter what the territory, the political and legal structures would determine or more accurately visually demonstrate, for the purpose of this exercise, a relationship with the State. The exact nature and structure of the model, its form and shape, was discussed but deferred for later until Channa had a better understanding of all the other aspects, and how they all fit in with each other.
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